Question:

Jennifer Most teaching hospitals have clinical research departments. I had registered several years ago with Mass General in Boston. Periodically they sent me news of new studies. Am currently restarting the Biogen Protein Fusion study which looks very promising. Also, they tend to advertise (at least in Boston) these studies under “healthcare” want ads..looking for participants. good luck

Response:

>Can you >tell me how I can search for Phase II and Phase III trials. I would like to >possibly participate in one I’m in Ontario, Canada.

The following websites have information on clinical trials now ongoing or in the planning: Although the above seems mostly about US locations, this page had a number of places in Canada that specialize in dermatology research:  (go down the list to the end) I didn’t explore the entire site, so there may be more Canadian information somewhere. The National Psoriasis Foundation has a web page that lists information on clinical trials, but I didn’t see anything on Canada:l You might try writing to them to see if they have a corresponding organization that can help you in Canada. This page has other psoriasis organizations listed all over the world, but I didn’t see any for Canada. Weird… if Estonia and Hungary have them, you’d think Canada would certainly have something as well. Gee, maybe you should start one! Here is the National Institute of Health’s clinical trials listing: gui You can search by condition… lots of trials came back under “psoriasis”, but I didn’t explore further to see if anything was mentioned about Canada. Here’s another one:

Again, didn’t see anything about Canada. And another link: I suspect this one goes back to the same listing service, Centerwatch… but tried it anyway. Does have some good introductory information for anyone considering participating in a clinical trial. Another obvious resource would be your own physician, especially a specialist, as they should have information about any trials being conducted in your area. Good luck! Best regards,

Response:

Hi Lady Andy, I think I’ve asked this question before but I forget the answer. Can you tell me how I can search for Phase II and Phase III trials. I would like to possibly participate in one I’m in Ontario, Canada. Thanks in advance Jennifer Hide quoted text Show quoted text Following press release doesn’t thrill me particularly, but thought I’d post it anyway for those who are interested.

What I find more interesting is that this release is from the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting now being held (March 10 -15, 2000). We should be seeing a number of other interesting press releases coming out of this annual conference, including the current data on Enbrel’s use in psoriasis. I’ll report the releases as I get them. Release on Clobetasol Propionate Foam follows: Phase III Data on a Low-Residue Clobetasol Propionate Foam Used in the Treatment of Scalp Psoriasis Is Presented at the American Academy of Dermatology 58th Annual Meeting SAN FRANCISCO,

March 11 /PRNewswire/ Phase III clinical trial data, on OLUX(TM) (clobetasol propionate) Foam, 0.05%, an investigational low-residue foam formulation used to treat scalp psoriasis, were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. Scalp psoriasis, a difficult-to-treat condition affecting more than 3.2 million Americans, is marked by redness and scaling of the scalp, severe itching and irritation. A new drug application for OLUX for the treatment of

corticosteroid-responsive Hide quoted text Show quoted text scalp dermatoses is pending review by the Food and Drug Administration. At the end of the 14-day study of twice daily treatments, 74 percent of the patients treated with OLUX (clobetasol propionate) Foam, 0.05%, were clear or almost clear of their scalp psoriasis, versus 63 percent of those treated with the clobetasol propionate (CLO) solution, 0.05%.

Additionally, only 10 percent and 6 percent of those treated with placebo foam and placebo solution, respectively, showed similar improvement. Efficacy was evaluated by grading the signs and symptoms of scalp psoriasis, including plaque thickness, scaling, erythema and pruritus, and by assessing the overall response to treatment at the end of the study. The difference between OLUX and CLO solution for scaling was statistically significant, favoring OLUX. In the study, OLUX and CLO solution treatments were equally well tolerated. “This new data indicates that OLUX was successful in treating moderate-to- severe scalp psoriasis, was well tolerated and moves Connetics closer to providing low-residue treatments for all degrees of the condition,” said Ken Washenik, M.D., Ph.D. a clinical investigator in the trial. Dr. Washenik is Director of Dermatopharmacology at New York University Medical Center.

“If approved, OLUX has the potential to complement Luxiq in a continuum of care for scalp psoriasis.” Luxiq(TM) (betamethasone valerate) Foam, 0.12%, another topical drug from Connetics using the foam delivery system, was approved for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 1999, for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses of the scalp. Luxiq is a mid-potency > steroid. > Connetics Corporation, headquartered in Palo Alto, California, is focused on > the acquisition, development and commercialization of marketed and late-stage > products. Connetics currently markets Ridaura(R) (auranofin), a treatment for > rheumatoid arthritis, and Luxiq for the treatment of

corticosteroid-responsive – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> dermatoses of the scalp. Besides OLUX, another investigational product under > development is ConXn(R) (recombinant human relaxin) for the treatment of > scleroderma, infertility, peripheral vascular disease and other fibrotic > diseases. For more information on Connetics, you may visit the Connetics Web > Site at http://www.connetics.com. > CONTACT: Danine Summers of Connetics Corporation, 650-843-2834; > or Lori Green of Ruder Finn Healthcare, 212-593-6478, for > Connetics Corporation > SOURCE Connetics Corporation > CO: Connetics Corporation > ST: California > IN: MTC > SU: > Best regards,

Response:

Following press release doesn’t thrill me particularly, but thought I’d post it anyway for those who are interested. What I find more interesting is that this release is from the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting now being held (March 10 -15, 2000). We should be seeing a number of other interesting press releases coming out of this annual conference, including the current data on Enbrel’s use in psoriasis. I’ll report the releases as I get them. Release on Clobetasol Propionate Foam follows: Phase III Data on a Low-Residue Clobetasol Propionate Foam Used in the Treatment of Scalp Psoriasis Is Presented at the American Academy of Dermatology 58th Annual Meeting SAN FRANCISCO, March 11 /PRNewswire/ — Phase III clinical trial data, on OLUX(TM) (clobetasol propionate) Foam, 0.05%, an investigational low-residue foam formulation used to treat scalp psoriasis, were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. Scalp psoriasis, a difficult-to-treat condition affecting more than 3.2 million Americans, is marked by redness and scaling of the scalp, severe itching and irritation. A new drug application for OLUX for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive scalp dermatoses is pending review by the Food and Drug Administration. At the end of the 14-day study of twice daily treatments, 74 percent of the patients treated with OLUX (clobetasol propionate) Foam, 0.05%, were clear or almost clear of their scalp psoriasis, versus 63 percent of those treated with the clobetasol propionate (CLO) solution, 0.05%. Additionally, only 10 percent and 6 percent of those treated with placebo foam and placebo solution, respectively, showed similar improvement. Efficacy was evaluated by grading the signs and symptoms of scalp psoriasis, including plaque thickness, scaling, erythema and pruritus, and by assessing the overall response to treatment at the end of the study. The difference between OLUX and CLO solution for scaling was statistically significant, favoring OLUX. In the study, OLUX and CLO solution treatments were equally well tolerated. “This new data indicates that OLUX was successful in treating moderate-to- severe scalp psoriasis, was well tolerated and moves Connetics closer to providing low-residue treatments for all degrees of the condition,” said Ken Washenik, M.D., Ph.D. a clinical investigator in the trial. Dr. Washenik is Director of Dermatopharmacology at New York University Medical Center. “If approved, OLUX has the potential to complement Luxiq in a continuum of care for scalp psoriasis.” Luxiq(TM) (betamethasone valerate) Foam, 0.12%, another topical drug from Connetics using the foam delivery system, was approved for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 1999, for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses of the scalp. Luxiq is a mid-potency steroid. Connetics Corporation, headquartered in Palo Alto, California, is focused on the acquisition, development and commercialization of marketed and late-stage products. Connetics currently markets Ridaura(R) (auranofin), a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, and Luxiq for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses of the scalp. Besides OLUX, another investigational product under development is ConXn(R) (recombinant human relaxin) for the treatment of scleroderma, infertility, peripheral vascular disease and other fibrotic diseases. For more information on Connetics, you may visit the Connetics Web Site at http://www.connetics.com. CONTACT: Danine Summers of Connetics Corporation, 650-843-2834; or Lori Green of Ruder Finn Healthcare, 212-593-6478, for Connetics Corporation SOURCE Connetics Corporation CO: Connetics Corporation ST: California IN: MTC SU: Best regards,